The Spatial Sound Institute announces its participation in a 6-years research and development trajectory with the Living Architecture System Group (LASG).

Can architecture integrate living functions? The Living Architecture Systems Group (LASG) is bringing together pioneering researchers and industry partners in a multidisciplinary research cluster dedicated to developing built environments with qualities that come close to life—environments that can move, respond, learn, and which are adaptive and empathic towards their inhabitants.

LASG’s work has the potential to change how we build architecture by transforming the physical structures that support buildings and the technical systems that control them. Intelligent controls, machine learning, lightweight scaffolds, kinetic mechanisms, and self-renewing synthetic biology systems are being integrated in prototypes, exploring how these different systems might be fully integrated into new generations of buildings. 

Researchers are currently exploring architecture as environments able to respond and adapt to changing conditions, and to engage in active conversations and mutual exchange with their occupants, such as Epiphyte Chamber, National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea (2013-14).

Researchers are currently exploring architecture as environments able to respond and adapt to changing conditions, and to engage in active conversations and mutual exchange with their occupants, such as Epiphyte Chamber, National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea (2013-14).

The role of the Spatial Sound Institute within the LASG will revolve around the central question, whether sound can become a structural material in the design of spaces - and therewith introduce new functionalities and aesthetic dimensions in architecture. Acoustical sculpting of the environment, the role of sound in the quality of human experience and investigation of sound as one of the origins of architecture will be some of the subjects the Spatial Sound Institute will address over the coming six years in the form of exhibitions, workshops, lectures and publications.

LASG’s long-term objectives include development of advanced prototype envelopes that have achieved fully integrated self-renewing intelligent, empathetic systems, capable of functioning within existing inhabited buildings. This long-range research has the objective of finding practical strategies for achieving resilience and adaptability in states of disequilibrium, such as those currently occurring in the natural environment.

Supported by Canada’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Partnership Grant, the LASG is anchored in multiple facilities at the University of Waterloo and include Canadian partners at the RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University, the University of Calgary, OCAD U, York University, and Concordia University and draws upon key collaborations from design-based research clusters in the USA and Europe.

www.livingarchitecturesystems.com